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Viewing posts from: July 2017

What are probiotics?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

probiotics Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts, naturally found in your body that are good for your health -- especially your digestive system. We usually think of bacteria as something that can be harmful, but in the case of probiotics it’s a good thing. Your body is full of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are often called "good" or "helpful" bacteria because they help keep your gut healthy. What do probiotics do? Probiotics help move food through your gut. You can get extra probiotics from certain foods and supplements and often help to calm certain health conditions such as:

  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Infectious diarrhea
  • Antibiotic-related diarrhea
There is research that also shows they can help with other items such as:
  • Skin conditions such as eczema
  • Urinary and vaginal health
  • Preventing allergies and colds
  • Oral health
  If you are interested in learning more about probiotics and your health talk to your doctor.  

Food Triggers for Headaches and Migraines

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

headache causing foods Have you ever eaten your face off and later felt a headache coming on? Not fun, right? Well there are actually foods that can trigger headaches and even worse migraines. Not every headache or migraine is tied to a trigger. But, if yours are, one of the best ways to prevent them is to learn your triggers and do your best to avoid them. For some people, that means saying no to certain foods. Common Trigger Foods Some common trigger foods include:

  • Apples
  • Bananas
  • Beans (fava or other similar beans)
  • Chocolate
  • Corn
  • Citrus fruits
  • Cultured dairy products (such as yogurt)
  • Nuts and nut butters
  • Onions
  • Tomatoes
Additionally red wine and other alcoholic drinks like beer, champagne, and hard liquor can also causes headaches and migraines. Check your eating habits and monitor those that may be causing you headaches or migraines. And talk to your doctor about how you can cut back on trigger foods.

No ice cream for me – I’m lactose Intolerant.

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

lactose intolerance Ice cream. It’s summer right? Ice cream sounds like a great treat in this warm summer weather. But, wait? Dairy. As much as you want that ice cream, you know your stomach just really can’t handle it. You just so happen to be lactose intolerant and your body just doesn’t do well when you eat anything with dairy… including ice cream. Lactose intolerant you say? What is that and what are the signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance? Lactose intolerance means the body cannot easily digest lactose, a type of natural sugar found in milk and dairy products. This is not the same thing as a food allergy to milk. When lactose moves through the large intestine without being properly digested, it can cause uncomfortable symptoms such as gas, belly pain, and bloating. Some people who have lactose intolerance cannot digest any milk products. Others can eat or drink small amounts of milk products or certain types of milk products without problems. Lactose intolerance is common in adults. It occurs more often in Native Americans and people of Asian, African, and South American descent than among people of European descent. A big challenge for people who are lactose-intolerant is learning how to eat to avoid discomfort and to get enough calcium for healthy bones. Signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance:

  • Bloating
  • Pain or cramps
  • Gurgling or rumbling sounds in your belly
  • Gas
  • Loose stools or diarrhea
  • Throwing up
If you feel you may have a dairy or lactose intolerance, talk to your doctor. It’s more common than you think.  

Air Quality Effects on Health

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

Buildings silhouette cityscape. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), urban areas are the most susceptible because of all the pollution being emitted from cars, trucks and buses. Broad industrialized valleys penned in by mountain ranges tend to trap smog, making air quality poor and life miserable for those people working, working out, or playing outside on hot summer days. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), urban areas are the most susceptible because of all the pollution being emitted from cars, trucks and buses. Broad industrialized valleys penned in by mountain ranges tend to trap smog, making air quality poor and life miserable for those people working, working out, or playing outside on hot summer days. How does air quality affect your health, you may ask?

  • Breathing polluted air puts you at a higher risk for asthma and other respiratory diseases
  • When exposed to ground ozone for 6 to 7 hours, scientific evidence show that healthy people’s lung function decreased and they suffered from respiratory inflammation
  • Air pollutants are mostly carcinogens and living in a polluted area can put people at risk of Cancer
  • Coughing and wheezing are common symptoms observed on city folks
  • Damages the immune system, endocrine and reproductive systems
  • High levels of particle pollution have been associated with higher incidents of heart problems
  • The toxic chemicals released into the air settle into plants and water sources. Animals eat the contaminated plants and drink the water. The poison then travels up the food chain – to us
Those are just a few of the problems poor air quality can cause poor health. When it’s hot, as it’s been the last several weeks in Colorado our air quality can decline. Be careful when it’s hot and remember what poor air quality can do to your health.

Get outside and Play! July is National Parks and Recreation Month

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

Friendly children playing in a park, running with colourful banners, in vintage style develop Discover the power of play and adventure this month. It’s summer and it’s July - National Parks and Recreation Month. We are so lucky to have as many wonderful parks for us and our family to play or exercise in. Or even just to relax, meditate, and take a break from the general craziness of life. For children and adults, play is a vital part of our mental wellbeing, physical health and personal interactions. We challenge you to get your play on at your local parks and recreation. Whether it’s summer camp, an adult sports league, exploring a trail, yoga class, meeting friends on the playground, playing cards in the park, or discovering nature — parks and play go hand in hand. And play and exercise also go hand and hand, which promotes a healthy and active lifestyle. Each July since 1985, America has celebrated Park and Recreation Month, a program of the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA). The goal is to raise awareness of the vital impact that parks, recreation and conservation has on communities across the U.S. Parks are the cornerstone of nearly every community, serving millions of people as the places anyone can go to be active, live healthier, connect with nature and gather together. Get out there and play in your local park! Enjoy it and have fun outside.