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Viewing posts from: September 2017

Have you ever heard of Reye’s Syndrome?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Reye Syndrome   Have you ever heard of Reye's Syndrome? Reye's Syndrome is a deadly disease, strikes swiftly and can attack any child, teen, or adult without warning. All body organs are affected with the liver and brain suffering most seriously. While the cause and cure remain unknown, research has established a link between Reye's Syndrome and the use of aspirin and other salicylate containing medications, over the counter products, and topical use products. Reye's Syndrome is a two-phase illness because it is almost always associated with a previous viral infection such as influenza (flu), cold, or chicken pox. Scientists do know that Reye's Syndrome is not contagious and the cause is unknown. Reye's Syndrome is often misdiagnosed as encephalitis, meningitis, diabetes, drug overdose, poisoning, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or psychiatric illness.   Reye's Syndrome tends to appear with greatest frequency during January, February, and March when influenza is most common. Cases are reported in every month of the year. An epidemic of flu or chickenpox is commonly followed by an increase in the number of cases of Reye's Syndrome.   When Reye's Syndrome develops, it typically occurs when a person is beginning to recover from a viral illness. Abnormal accumulations of fat begin to develop in the liver and other organs of the body, along with a severe increase of pressure in the brain. Unless diagnosed and treated successfully, death is common, often within a few days, and even a few hours. A person's life depends upon early diagnosis. Statistics indicate an excellent chance of recovery when Reye's Syndrome is diagnosed and treated in its earliest stages. The later the diagnosis and treatment, the more severely reduced are the chances for successful recovery and survival.   Make sure to talk to your doctor if you have any additional questions about Reye's Syndrome.

What is Prostatitis?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

What is Prostatitis   What is Prostatitis? Ever heard of it Prostatitis? Or in other words prostate inflammation? Consider reading this in order to be aware of the effects Prostatitis has on the prostate.  Prostatitis is inflammation of the prostate. The prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system and about the size of a walnut. The prostate gland sits below a man's bladder and surrounds the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from a man's bladder out of his body. There are two main forms of prostatitis: bacterial and nonbacterial. Bacterial prostatitis is caused by an infection in the prostate. Antibiotics are the main course of treatment. Nonbacterial prostatitis has no signs of bacteria in the urine when tests are run. While the cause is often unknown, nonbacterial prostatitis may be linked to stress, nerve damage, injuries or prior urinary tract infections. General signs of prostatitis may include painful or frequent urination, lower back pain, pain in the bladder and painful ejaculations. If you have any of these, see a healthcare provider who will do an exam and take a urine sample. Men with prostatitis should drink plenty of water and stay away from drinks such as coffee and alcohol which could make urinary symptoms worse. For pain management, medications like ibuprofen and hot baths may help. For more information on Prostatitis, talk to your doctor.

Cholesterol Levels – Make sure to get them checked!

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Cholesterol Children, young adults and older Americans can have high cholesterol. Consider getting your blood cholesterol checked and take steps to lower it if it is high. Learn about lipid profiles and about food and lifestyle choices that help you reach personal cholesterol goals. How many Americans have high cholesterol? More than 102 million American Adults (20 years or older) have total cholesterol levels at or above 200 mg/dL, which is above healthy levels. More than 35 million of these people have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher, which puts them at high risk for heart disease. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance found in your body and many foods. Your body needs cholesterol to function normally and makes all that you need. Too much cholesterol can build up in your arteries. After a while, these deposits narrow your arteries, putting you at risk for heart disease and stroke. How do you know if your cholesterol is high? High cholesterol usually doesn't have any symptoms. As a result, many people do not know that their cholesterol levels are too high. However, doctors can do a simple blood test to check your cholesterol. High cholesterol can be controlled through lifestyle changes or if it is not enough, through medications. It's important to check your cholesterol levels. High cholesterol is a major risk factor for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Have you had your cholesterol levels checked in a while? Talk to your doctor about getting your cholesterol levels checked.

Baby Safety Month

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Baby safety Through Baby Safety Month, September is a time to celebrate your baby and keep them safe. There are so many ways to baby-proof your home or take precautions with your kids, and here are a few ideas: Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for all young children. Every day in the U.S., approximately 8,000 children are treated in the emergency room for fall-related injuries.   What Can You Do? The best way to prevent injury is direct supervision- watch, listen and stay close to your child. Strap in for Safety Child safety devices, like safety belts and straps, should always be used when available. Straps, safety belts, and harnesses on baby gear reduce the risk of infant fall injuries. Whether it's in the home or on the go, learn how to properly use straps on a variety of products and the importance of correctly using them EVERY time in order to keep baby safe.   Baby Safety Month September is Baby Safety Month. Baby Safety Month started in 1983.  In 1986, it was extended to a week-long celebration, until 1991, when JPMA sponsored the first “Baby Safety Awareness Month.” Since then, every September has been designated as Baby Safety Month.  

What is blood cancer?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

blood cancer Blood cancer comes in a few different forms. There are three main groups of blood cancer including, leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Each type affecting the blood, bone marrow and lymphatic system. Leukaemia Leukaemia affects your white blood cells, made in your bone marrow. Leukaemia patients produce an abnormal number of immature white blood cells which ‘clog up’ your bone marrow and stop it making other blood cells vital for a balanced immune system and healthy blood. Acute leukemia comes on suddenly, progresses quickly and needs to be treated urgently. Chronic leukemia develops more slowly, over months or years. Lymphoma Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that affects your lymphatic system. If you have lymphoma it means you make too many lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Your lymphocytes also live longer than they should. This overload compromises your immune system. Lymphoma can develop in many parts of your body, including your lymph nodes, bone marrow, blood, spleen and other organs. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of blood disorders where a person’s bone marrow is not producing the correct amount and quality of blood cells. Red, white and platelet cells can be affected. Symptoms make you very tired, weak and bleed or bruise more easily. There are different levels of severity of MDS; it’s not a type of leukaemia but can sometimes lead to acute myeloid leukaemia. MDS is rare – about 4 in every 100,000 people get MDS. It mainly affects older people, and is more common in people over 70 years old. September is Blood Cancer awareness month. If you have questions about blood cancers, ask your doctor for more information.