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Viewing posts from: December 2018

New Year’s Resolutions: Stop Smoking & Know the Facts About Smoking

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

New Year’s Resolutions: Stop Smoking & Know the Facts About Smoking quit smoking Even if you think smoking has decreased in the United States, every year more than 480,000 people die from tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke, making it the leading cause of preventable death in this country. Tragically, each day thousands of kids still pick up a tobacco product for the first time. And even more are exposed to the health hazards of smoking through second hand smoke.   Do you know the facts about smoking? Read on to find out and if you’re a smoker, consider making quitting a resolution for your New Year.   According to the American Lung Association:   Health Effects Smoking and use of tobacco products, including cigars and smokeless tobacco, cause or worsen numerous diseases and conditions. Learn more about how smoking and using tobacco impacts your health.   What's In a Cigarette? Arsenic, lead, tar— these are just few of more than 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke. See what else is in a cigarette.   The Impact of Tobacco Use Tobacco use has a larger impact on certain populations. Learn more about these groups and how the tobacco industry markets its products.   Kids and Smoking The best way to prevent tobacco-related illness and death is to keep kids from starting to smoke in the first place. See why kids start and get tips to talk to your kids about smoking.  

Holiday Health & Safety Tips

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Holiday Health & Safety Tips holiday-safety It’s the holidays! A time to relax and celebrate with friends and family. Unfortunately, the holidays do not come hazard free and we’re here to make you aware of hazards so you can have a happy and healthy holiday. The endless string of parties, cooking new recipes in your home, even shopping can be hazardous to your wellbeing. The following tips will help you stay risk free this holiday. Avoid Flammable Christmas Trees More than 400 residential fires involve Christmas trees every year. These fires result in as many as 40 deaths and 100 injuries during the holidays. Though Christmas trees cause the fewest holiday-related fires, they account for the greatest percentage of deaths, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Avoid Deep Fried Turkey Fires Deep-frying your turkey is a delicious way to cook your bird, but deep frying can be so dangerous most companies that produce deep fryers refuse to stamp any fryers on the market with its iconic UL logo. From 1998 to 2007, there were at least 138 incidents involving turkey fryers that caused 36 injuries and more than $7.8 million in property loss. Avoid Gift Opening Hazards In addition to the troublesome questions about the safety of the toys themselves, did you know each year about 6,000 people in the United States visit the ER with wounds from trying to pry, slice, or stab open gifts encased in hard plastic containers or held down with a thousand metal twist ties? Crazy, right? Be conscious of what you’re opening and how you’re opening it to avoid this holiday hazard. Avoid Decoration Disasters Did you know more than 5,000 people are injured in decorating-related falls each holiday season? To make sure you're not a statistic this year try the following when stringing lights or hanging mistletoe.

  • Check that the ladder is on secure and level ground
  • Don't step on the top two rungs of the ladder
  • Space the ladder 1 foot away from the wall for every 4 feet high it reaches
  • Stay centered between rails and do not overreach
  • For roof access, extend the ladder at least 3 feet above the roof
  • Keep the top and the bottom of the ladder clear of obstacles
  • Make sure the ladder is locked open
Avoid Choking Did you know that Nearly 3,000 people in the United States die each year from choking? To avoid choking, take small bites, chew slowly and carefully, and avoid talking or being distracted while eating. Be wary of high risk foods including grapes, candy with nuts, and hard fruits and vegetables. Avoid holiday weight gain. Christmas cookies, giant family meals, eggnog— All that holiday joy adds up to at least a pound a year, but studies suggest that you never really take it off. Make sure to follow your exercise and diet routine even throughout the holidays. If you want to splurge make sure to substitute somewhere else in your diet. And keep moving!   These are just a few of the hazards to avoid to keep your holiday safe.  

Tips for a Healthy Christmas

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Tips for a Healthy Holiday healthy christmas Guess what? You can have a very merry Christmas and stay healthy too. In this article we have a few tips and tricks to keep you healthy this holiday season. Don’t sit down all day during the holidays It’s tempting to watch every TV Christmas special during the holiday. Get outside, no need to sit on the couch all day. Encourage the whole family to get out for a walk at some point – ideally, after dinner to aid digestion. The more activity, the better, so take along any new outdoor gifts, like bikes, scooters, footballs or Frisbees, or play old-fashioned games. Get outside and play! Avoid having too many alcoholic beverages The drinks over the holidays can really add up. Mulled wine on Christmas Eve, Breakfast bloody Mary’s, wine with dinner, spiked eggnog… the list goes on!  Monitor your alcoholic beverage intake and intersperse alcoholic drinks with non-alcoholic ones. And make sure you drink plenty of water to keep you hydrated. Don’t give yourself a Christmas stuffing! On average, we consume approximately 3,000 calories in our Christmas dinner alone – much more than most should have per day. Feasting with that many calories can not  only contribute to weight gain but also to indigestion and heartburn. It can also cause lethargy for the remainder of the day, reducing the chances of you burning much of it off. Instead of gorging yourself on Christmas dinner, eat a normal-sized meal and then take a 20-minute break to see if you are still hungry. The chances are, you’ll realize you’ve had enough. Keep stress to a minimum The holidays can be stressful! Many of us deal with the stresses of overspending, cooking, cleaning, endless ‘to do’ lists and visitors we could do without. Try to keep a sense of humor and proportion. Remember, Christmas is just one day of the year and isn’t worth stressing over. Enjoy it and it’s imperfections. Eat fruit and veggies Think you get your recommend fruit and veggie intake during the holidays? Most of us get through the entire Christmas break without eating much fruit and veggies. With all of the chocolate, cookies, and food indulgences, why would you?  But at this time of late nights and overindulging, it’s more important than ever to get your vitamins and minerals, to help you stay in good health. Ensure that your Christmas shopping list enables you to fill up the fruit bowl and get your recommended daily portions of fruit and veggies. Do something for others It’s hard to avoid the craziness of Christmas, but it doesn’t all have to be about giving or receiving gifts. Try to do something for others this festive season, whether it’s baking some extra cookies for an elderly neighbor, inviting an acquaintance who doesn’t have family around them to your home or helping out with a local food bank or charity you believe in.   We hope you have a very healthy and happy holiday.  

The amazing effects pets have on mental health.

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The amazing effects pets have on mental health. pets and health Studies are continually showing that pets aren’t just fun to have around the house – there is health-boosting power among our furry, scaly or feathered friends. Everything from increasing activity to making you happier, pets have a wonderful impact on your psyche.   It’s no surprise that owning a pet – particularly a dog – makes you more active, but the list of health benefits that come with that might surprise. Older adults who own a dog have a lower body mass index, make fewer visits to the doctor and do more exercise. Research also shows that the stronger your bond with your pooch, the more likely you are to walk, and spend longer walking.   With all those walks, pets tend to be good for your heart too. The American Heart Association undertook a study about how owning pets affects your chance of developing cardiovascular disease, including conditions that affect your heart and blood, such as stroke or coronary heart disease. Researchers found that having a pet – a dog, in particular – is probably associated with reducing your chances of developing CVD, though they were careful not to overstate this. In a follow-up study researchers again looked at how having a dog or cat affected your health, and this time felines came up trumps. They found that having a cat is associated with a reduced chance of dying from cardiovascular disease, especially strokes. This shows that it’s not just the exercise associated with having a pet that helps you – the stress relief and companionship also have very physical benefits.   Pets make you more sociable. Even though you might feel grumpy sometimes and think you like quiet, humans are social animals. It’s important for our physical and mental health to have contact with other people – and our four-legged friends are a brilliant way to get you talking. Pets increase the number of off-chance chats you have and help people trust you and are brilliant ice-breakers. Social isolation is a huge health problem, particularly for the elderly. In fact, social isolation can increase your chances of dying early. So, what may seem like a trivial chat over the garden wall when looking for your cat or in the park when walking your dog, can be hugely significant for your mental and physical health.   Pets stop loneliness. It’s not just that pets help you build a wider social network – many people have pets as companions. They make you happy, give you a routine and are great company – all of which adds your quality of life and boosts your everyday mental health.   Pets reduce your stress. If you want to try and control your stress levels, go and chat to your pet. Studies have shown that pet owners reacted less to stress – and recovered from it much quicker – when their pets were present. Another study took 48 people with high blood pressure and high stress jobs. Researchers measured how they responded to stress before the test. Then, some of them bought a pet and six months later researchers again measured their response to stress. The results were interesting: after 6 months pet owners had less of a physical response to stress compared with those who didn’t have a four-legged friend.   Pets are great. And a lot of them need homes. Help out a pet (adopt!) while helping to improve your mental health.  

December 2nd – 8th is National Influenza Vaccination Week.

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December 2nd - 8th is National Influenza Vaccination Week. National Influenza Vaccination Week Now is the time to get your flu vaccine If you haven’t gotten yours yet. An annual flu vaccine is the first and best way to protect against the influenza virus.   National Influenza Vaccination Week (December 2nd - 8th) highlights the importance of continuing flu vaccination through the holiday season and beyond.   The Flu Vaccination Prevents Flu! Flu season is in full force. As long as flu viruses are spreading and causing illness, vaccination can still provide protection against flu. Most of the time, flu activity peaks between December and February in the United States, although activity can last as late as May. Flu activity is expected to increase in the coming weeks; the sooner you get vaccinated, the more likely you are to be protected against flu when activity picks up in your community.   Does everyone need the Flu Vaccine? According to the CDC, a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older as the first and most important step in protecting against seasonal flu viruses. Vaccination to prevent flu is particularly important for people who are at high risk of serious complications from influenza. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against flu.   Everyday Actions to Prevent the Flu In addition to getting your flu vaccine this season, the CDC also urges you to take everyday preventive actions to protect yourself and your loved ones from flu. The CDC says everyday preventive actions include the following:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • If you are sick, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone, except to get medical care or other necessities.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like flu.
  Call us and make an appointment to get your flu shot today! Or for more information, talk to your doctor.