Phone: 719-546-3600 | 4020 Jerry Murphy Road Pueblo, CO 81001

No ice cream for me - I’m lactose Intolerant.

07-20-2017
lactose intolerance Ice cream. It’s summer right? Ice cream sounds like a great treat in this warm summer weather. But, wait? Dairy. As much as you want that ice cream, you know your stomach just really can’t handle it. You just so happen to be lactose intolerant and your body just doesn’t do well when you eat anything with dairy… including ice cream. Lactose intolerant you say? What is that and what are the signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance? Lactose intolerance means the body cannot easily digest lactose, a type of natural sugar found in milk and dairy products. This is not the same thing as a food allergy to milk. When lactose moves through the large intestine without being properly digested, it can cause uncomfortable symptoms such as gas, belly pain, and bloating. Some people who have lactose intolerance cannot digest any milk products. Others can eat or drink small amounts of milk products or certain types of milk products without problems. Lactose intolerance is common in adults. It occurs more often in Native Americans and people of Asian, African, and South American descent than among people of European descent. A big challenge for people who are lactose-intolerant is learning how to eat to avoid discomfort and to get enough calcium for healthy bones. Signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance:

  • Bloating
  • Pain or cramps
  • Gurgling or rumbling sounds in your belly
  • Gas
  • Loose stools or diarrhea
  • Throwing up
If you feel you may have a dairy or lactose intolerance, talk to your doctor. It’s more common than you think.  

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Air Quality Effects on Health

07-13-2017
Buildings silhouette cityscape. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), urban areas are the most susceptible because of all the pollution being emitted from cars, trucks and buses. Broad industrialized valleys penned in by mountain ranges tend to trap smog, making air quality poor and life miserable for those people working, working out, or playing outside on hot summer days. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), urban areas are the most susceptible because of all the pollution being emitted from cars, trucks and buses. Broad industrialized valleys penned in by mountain ranges tend to trap smog, making air quality poor and life miserable for those people working, working out, or playing outside on hot summer days. How does air quality affect your health, you may ask?

  • Breathing polluted air puts you at a higher risk for asthma and other respiratory diseases
  • When exposed to ground ozone for 6 to 7 hours, scientific evidence show that healthy people’s lung function decreased and they suffered from respiratory inflammation
  • Air pollutants are mostly carcinogens and living in a polluted area can put people at risk of Cancer
  • Coughing and wheezing are common symptoms observed on city folks
  • Damages the immune system, endocrine and reproductive systems
  • High levels of particle pollution have been associated with higher incidents of heart problems
  • The toxic chemicals released into the air settle into plants and water sources. Animals eat the contaminated plants and drink the water. The poison then travels up the food chain – to us
Those are just a few of the problems poor air quality can cause poor health. When it’s hot, as it’s been the last several weeks in Colorado our air quality can decline. Be careful when it’s hot and remember what poor air quality can do to your health.

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Get outside and Play! July is National Parks and Recreation Month

07-06-2017
Friendly children playing in a park, running with colourful banners, in vintage style develop Discover the power of play and adventure this month. It’s summer and it’s July - National Parks and Recreation Month. We are so lucky to have as many wonderful parks for us and our family to play or exercise in. Or even just to relax, meditate, and take a break from the general craziness of life. For children and adults, play is a vital part of our mental wellbeing, physical health and personal interactions. We challenge you to get your play on at your local parks and recreation. Whether it’s summer camp, an adult sports league, exploring a trail, yoga class, meeting friends on the playground, playing cards in the park, or discovering nature — parks and play go hand in hand. And play and exercise also go hand and hand, which promotes a healthy and active lifestyle. Each July since 1985, America has celebrated Park and Recreation Month, a program of the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA). The goal is to raise awareness of the vital impact that parks, recreation and conservation has on communities across the U.S. Parks are the cornerstone of nearly every community, serving millions of people as the places anyone can go to be active, live healthier, connect with nature and gather together. Get out there and play in your local park! Enjoy it and have fun outside.

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Fourth of July Firework Safety Tips

06-28-2017
Firework-safety Independence Day - July 4th - is a fun holiday with fireworks, patriotism, barbecues and so much more. But with fun, often comes danger! Did you know Independence day is the holiday with the most fires? Fireworks (often coming into contact with decorations) are often a large culprit when looking at the causes of fires over the Independence Day holiday. Fire is just one of the many precautions you and our family can take for firework and decoration safety over the holiday. Read the following tips to keep you and your family safe from fireworks this July 4th. Tip #1 Have a fire extinguisher readily available. This way if there was an accidental fire, the fire can be put out quickly. Tip #2 If you have fireworks, have water buckets and a hose available. This is also important in the case that a fire becomes larger than a small extinguisher can take care of. Tip #3 Alcohol is a favorite of many for the holiday celebrations. However, it is important to keep alcohol away from children and animals and especially out of the hands with those that have fireworks. Alcohol causes judgement impairment and could lead to not only a fire, but other accidents including alcohol poisoning impaired driving, and much more. Be smart and limit your alcohol consumption during the 4th of July. Tip #4 When you are disposing of 4th of July decorations and fireworks, make sure that they are completely free of heat and fire. This way there will not be a smoldering fire happening after the party is over. Tip #5 Make sure that the area you are lighting fireworks off is also free of bushes, dry grass, trees, streamers, balloons, flammable helium, and other fire hazardous materials. Tip #6 Safety includes removing small pieces of balloons, fireworks, and other items that are able to choke small children.  Tip #7 Stay away from illegal fireworks. They are illegal due to the increased danger involved with certain types of fireworks. Here is a list of the fireworks to avoid.

  • Large re-loadable mortar shells
  • Cherry bombs
  • M-80 salutes
  • Large firecrackers
  Following this 4th of July firework and decoration safety tips should make it easier to maintain a safe and fire-free environment for all.  

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Prostate Cancer

06-22-2017
prostate cancer Prostate Cancer With June being Men’s health awareness month, we’d like to discuss prostate cancer in this blog post. Prostate cancer has become one of the most common cancers found in men and it’s an important point of discussion and something everyone should be aware of. Here are a few things to know about the prostate and prostate cancer:

  • The prostate is a gland found only in men. It is about the size of a walnut and sits below the bladder.
  • Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. One in seven men in the United States will be diagnosed with the disease in his lifetime.
  • Compared to other men, African-American men and men with a family history of the disease are at higher risk of developing prostate cancer. A man with a father or brother who had prostate cancer is twice as likely to develop the disease.
  • The BRCA 1/2 mutation is also believed to increase prostate cancer risk.
All men are at risk for prostate cancer at any point in their lifetime.  However, there are specific risk factors that increase the likelihood that certain men will develop the disease. Risk factors include:
  • Age: Aggressive prostate cancer is virtually nonexistent in men under 40. With age, however, the chance of developing prostate cancer increases. Nearly two-thirds of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over 65, and nearly one-half of prostate cancer deaths occur in men initially diagnosed after 75.
  • Race: Prostate cancer is about twice as common among African-American men as it is among white American men.
  • Diet: Epidemiological data suggest that the diet consumed in industrialized Western countries may be a factor in developing prostate cancer. Consider the following information regarding diet and its effect on the risk for prostate cancer:
    • Fat: Some studies suggest that men who eat a high-fat diet, especially if it is high in red meat or high-fat dairy products, may have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer.
    • Fruits and vegetables: Diets high in fruits and vegetables may lower prostate cancer risk, although it is not clear which nutrient(s) may be responsible for this.
    • Carotenoids: Carotenoids, such as lycopenes, have been shown to inhibit the growth of human prostate cancer cells grown in the laboratory. The primary source of lycopenes is processed tomatoes. Again, however, it is not clear if lycopenes affect prostate cancer risk in men, as not all studies have found a benefit.
  Talk to your doctor if you or a loved one is at risk of prostate cancer. One chat could save a life.

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