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Showing posts from tagged with: antibiotic overuse

What is ovarian cancer?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

What is ovarian cancer? Women are becoming more and more at risk of ovarian cancer. But many are still not sure what it even is. According to the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, Ovarian cancer is a disease in which, depending on the type and stage of the disease, malignant (cancerous) cells are found inside, near, or on the outer layer of the ovaries. An ovary is one of two small, almond-shaped organs located on each side of the uterus that store eggs, or germ cells, and produce female hormones estrogen and progesterone.

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Cancer Basics Cancer develops when abnormal cells in a part of the body (in this case, the ovary) begin to grow uncontrollably. This abnormal cell growth is common among all cancer types. Normally, cells in your body divide and form new cells to replace worn out or dying cells, and to repair injuries. Because cancer cells continue to grow and divide, they are different from normal cells. Instead of dying, they outlive normal cells and continue to create new abnormal cells, forming a tumor. Tumors can put pressure on other organs near the ovaries. Cancer cells can sometimes travel to other parts of the body, where they begin to grow and replace normal tissue. This process, called metastasis, occurs as the cancer cells move into the bloodstream or lymph system of the body. Cancer cells that spread from other organ sites (such as breast or colon) to the ovary are not considered ovarian cancer. Cancer type is determined by the original site of the malignancy.   The general outlook of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. In women age 35-74, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths. An estimated one woman in 78 will develop ovarian cancer during her lifetime. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be over 22,280 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed this year and that more than 14,240 women will die from ovarian cancer this year. When one is diagnosed and treated in the earliest stages, the five-year survival rate is over 90 percent. Due to ovarian cancer's non-specific symptoms and lack of early detection tests, about 20 percent of all cases are found early, meaning in stage I or II. If caught in stage III or higher, the survival rate can be as low as 28 percent. Due to the nature of the disease, each woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer has a different profile and it is impossible to provide a general prognosis. Talk to your doctor about your risks of ovarian cancer. 

Antibiotic Overuse

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

AntibioticOveruse With the recent news discussing the superbug that may not be killed by the antibiotics currently on the market, there has been a lot of discussion surrounding the overuse of antibiotics. Every year, your family may share of colds, sore throats, and other viruses as they cycle through society.  When you visit the doctor with these illnesses, do you automatically expect a prescription for antibiotics? Many people do. And they're surprised, if they leave the doctor's office empty-handed — after all, who doesn’t want to get better as quickly as possible? But your doctor could be doing you and your family a favor by not reaching for the prescription pad. Taking antibiotics for colds and other viral illnesses not only won't work, but it can also have dangerous side effects — over time, this practice actually helps create bacteria that are harder to kill. Frequent and inappropriate use of antibiotics can cause bacteria or other microbes to change so antibiotics don’t work against them. This is called bacterial resistance or antibiotic resistance. Treating these resistant bacteria requires higher doses of medicine or stronger antibiotics. Because of antibiotic overuse, certain bacteria have become resistant to even the most powerful antibiotics available today. Antibiotic resistance is a widespread problem, and one that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) calls "one of the world's most pressing public health problems." Bacteria that were once highly responsive to antibiotics have become more and more resistant. Among those that are becoming harder to treat are pneumococcal infections (which cause pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, and meningitis), skin infections, and tuberculosis. In addition to antibiotic resistance, overusing antibiotics can lead to other problems. Antibiotics kill many different bacteria, even the good ones that help keep the body healthy. Sometimes taking antibiotics can cause a person to develop diarrhea due to a lack of good bacteria that help digest food properly. In some cases, bad bacteria, like Clostridium difficile (or C diff), may overgrow and cause infections. Talk to your doctor about antibiotic use. And remember your doctor will only prescribe them if they are needed.