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Showing posts from tagged with: healthy

Tips for Healthy Aging

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Tips for Healthy Aging healthy aging You don’t have to be over 65 to care about how you age. Healthy aging is something that we should consider life-long. Being active, eating healthy, and getting enough sleep are just a few of the things we should consider when trying to stay healthy and age gracefully. cYou should also consider the following: Maintain your brain Keep your brain active at all stages of life. One in eight older adults (aged 65+) in the United States has Alzheimer's disease, and some cognitive decline is a normal part of aging. Studies have shown that a lifestyle that includes cognitive stimulation through active learning slows cognitive decline. Cultivate your relationships Twenty-eight percent of older adults live alone, and living alone is the strongest risk factor for loneliness. Common life changes in older adulthood, such as retirement, health issues, or the loss of a spouse, may lead to social isolation. Adults who engage in meaningful community activities like volunteer work report feeling healthier and less depressed. Tips: Join a planning committee, volunteer, take a trip with friends, play cards at your local senior center, or join a book club. Remember that participating in activities should be fun, not stressful! Live an active lifestyle Regular exercise is one of the greatest keys to physical and mental wellbeing. Living an active life will help you stay fit enough to maintain your independence to go where you want to and perform your own activities. Regular exercise may prevent or even provide relief from many common chronic conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, depression, and arthritis, to name a few. Get enough sleep Humans can go longer without food than without sleep. Older adults need just as much sleep as younger adults – seven to nine hours per night – but often get much less. Lack of sleep can cause depression, irritability, increased fall risk, and memory problems. Reduce stress As we age, our stressors change and so does our ability to deal with stress. Long-term stress can damage brain cells and lead to depression. Stress may also cause memory loss, fatigue, and decreased ability to fight off and recover from infection. In fact, it is estimated that more than 90% of illness is either caused or complicated by stress. Take charge of your health Most of our health is not controlled by the health care system but by our own actions, our environment, our genes, and social factors. In addition, physicians are not perfect; medical errors do happen. The more patients participate in their own health care, the more satisfied they tend to be with the care they receive. Keep your health in check and make sure to consider these great tips for healthy aging.  

Healthy living for the new year

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Healthy living for the new year It’s a new year, help be a healthier you. Here are some simple rules for getting back on track. healthy living Eat Your Fruit and Veggies! What does this mean? Avoid processed foods and eat foods in their natural state. Vegetables and fruits are filled with antioxidants, phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals. These are the items you need to support a healthy body. Eating a wide variety of different-colored fruits and veggies is always a healthy choice. When you look at your plate make sure 80% is fresh or lightly cooked vegetables. Minimize Processed Food Intake. Foods that are processed usually come in a box or bag and have a long shelf life. These include things like crackers, chips, cookies, cereals, and cake mixes, and they have little to no water content. Processed foods can contain unhealthy fats (see next). Eat Healthy Fats. Avocado, coconut oil, olives, nuts, seeds, unheated olive and flax oil, clean salmon, and nuts are all items that include healthy fats. Healthy fats are important for providing energy, healthy cell membranes, and hormone balance. Stay away from margarine, vegetable shortening, fried foods, and anything with “partially hydrogenated” oil listed in the ingredients. Make Your Meals with Love. Sharing meals and making them with love will not only allow you to take time to connect offline, with those you love, but also allows you to see exactly what you are eating/cooking. Create community and connection with your family and friends by getting creative with healthy recipes that inspire conversation and nourish those you care about. Drink Water! Drink 8 glasses of filtered water a day. Our body is about 60% water; drinking enough water maintains fluid balance, which transports nutrients, regulates body temperature and digests food. Dehydration lowers energy levels and brain function. Proper hydration also promotes healthy bowel movements, keeps our skin clear and flushes toxins. You can infuse your water with fresh herbs, fruit, or a dash of honey for sweetness. Eat with the Seasons. Buying produce from farmers markets is a great way to see what’s fresh and seasonal in your area. In the cooler months, eat more warming foods like soups, hot teas, and warming spices like cinnamon, pepper, and garlic. In the warmer months, eat more cooling foods like fresh green juices, salads and ingredients like lettuce, cucumbers, watermelon and cooling spices like peppermint, fennel, and cilantro. Do Not Overeat. Overeating can result in symptoms such as fatigue, slow metabolism, water retention, loose stool and a feeling of heaviness. Try not to overload your plate with large portions. Make sure vegetables take up the largest percentage when possible. Have a happy, healthy New Year!

Avoid the Thanksgiving Food Coma

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

thanksgiving-nap The holidays are the hardest time of year to eat healthily. And it’s really hard not to overeat and feel lethargic after your big meal. Luckily, the folks at Cornell University's Food and Brand Lab have discovered helpful tricks over the years to help people eat better.   Eat a healthy snack to get in a healthy mindset. You know the samples they hand out at the grocery store? Go for it, if they are healthy. Researchers found that a free sample of a healthy snack led grocery shoppers to buy 25% more fruits and vegetables than if they'd been given nothing and 28% more than people given a cookie. How does this relate to thanksgiving you may ask? Get in a healthy-eating mindset by avoiding fattening appetizers in favor of fresh fruit or raw veggies.   Use smaller plates. When people serve food onto a 12-inch plate, they portion out 22% more food than when they use a 10-inch plate, the Food and Brand Lab has found. This is important since other research from the Lab has found people eat 92% of the food that they self-serve, yet still feel satisfied when their plate is smaller.   Drink from tall, skinny glasses. Along the same lines, studies show people tend to pour 28% more liquid into a short, wide glass than a tall, skinny one. By pouring into a narrow glass, we will consume fewer calories.   Serve yourself the healthiest food first. Research into the behavior of buffet lines suggests people tend to overload their plates with whatever is  at the front. Then they gradually fill the plate with the rest of the items.Studies found this ratio is roughly 2:1 — two-thirds of the plate is occupied by the first thing people portion out. When you pick your seat, sit next to the vegetables. You'll naturally eat more of them.   Put down your fork between bites. Mind over matter! It takes about 20 minutes for the "full" feeling in your stomach to reach your brain and tell you to stop eating. Therefore take more time, put down your fork before your stomach fills up. You'll eat slower, consume less, and still have room for dessert.  

Air Quality Effects on Health

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

Buildings silhouette cityscape. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), urban areas are the most susceptible because of all the pollution being emitted from cars, trucks and buses. Broad industrialized valleys penned in by mountain ranges tend to trap smog, making air quality poor and life miserable for those people working, working out, or playing outside on hot summer days. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), urban areas are the most susceptible because of all the pollution being emitted from cars, trucks and buses. Broad industrialized valleys penned in by mountain ranges tend to trap smog, making air quality poor and life miserable for those people working, working out, or playing outside on hot summer days. How does air quality affect your health, you may ask?

  • Breathing polluted air puts you at a higher risk for asthma and other respiratory diseases
  • When exposed to ground ozone for 6 to 7 hours, scientific evidence show that healthy people’s lung function decreased and they suffered from respiratory inflammation
  • Air pollutants are mostly carcinogens and living in a polluted area can put people at risk of Cancer
  • Coughing and wheezing are common symptoms observed on city folks
  • Damages the immune system, endocrine and reproductive systems
  • High levels of particle pollution have been associated with higher incidents of heart problems
  • The toxic chemicals released into the air settle into plants and water sources. Animals eat the contaminated plants and drink the water. The poison then travels up the food chain – to us
Those are just a few of the problems poor air quality can cause poor health. When it’s hot, as it’s been the last several weeks in Colorado our air quality can decline. Be careful when it’s hot and remember what poor air quality can do to your health.

Lose Weight, Get Healthy, and all with the help of a Shelter Dog!

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

We saw this video and not only did it warm our hearts, but it got us thinking about how you can get active, lose weight and save a pet all at once. It takes commitment, but pets can help you get on your way to a better life, in all sorts of ways.  And here’s why:  

Mutual Rescue - Eric and Peety. Rescue dog saves man's health and life.

Mutual Rescue - Eric and Peety. Rescue dog saves man's health and life.

Drinking beet juice can increase the length of your workout.

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

  Beet-Juice-Helps-Lower-Blood-Pressure-Medium-1024x683 Beet Juice? Who knew? Beet juice is a dietary source of the molecule nitrate. When converted in the body, nitrate can dilate the blood vessels and increase blood flow, both important factors for exercise performance. In a new study from American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, healthy male subjects who drank beet juice for 15 days had lower blood pressure and more dilated blood vessels at rest and during exercise. Blood vessels also dilate more easily and the heart consumed less oxygen during exercise with beet juice consumption. According to the researchers, the findings suggest that beet juice can be used as a dietary nutraceutical supplement to enhance oxygen delivery to the muscles and reduce the work the heart does during exercise. Exercise can be "performed at a given workload for a longer period of time before the onset of fatigue," the researchers added. Talk to your doctor about healthy ways you can improve your workouts.

An Ultimate Superfood – Blueberries

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

blueberries Blueberries are not only popular, but repeatedly ranked in the U.S. diet as having one of the highest antioxidant capacities among all fruits, vegetables, spices and seasonings. Antioxidants are essential to optimizing health by helping to combat the free radicals that can damage cellular structures as well as DNA. As one of the few fruits native to North America, blueberries have been enjoyed by Native Americans for hundreds of years and have been enjoyed around the world in cuisines from Asia to the Mediterranean. What's New and Beneficial About Blueberries With their nervous system and brain benefits, research has shown that blueberries can improve memory. In a study involving older adults, 12 weeks of daily blueberry consumption was enough to improve scores on two different tests of cognitive function including memory. While participants in the study consumed blueberries in the form of juice, three-quarters of a pound of blueberries were used to make each cup of juice. As participants consumed between 2 to 2-1/2 cups each day, the participants actually received a very plentiful amount of berries. The authors of this study were encouraged by the results and suggested that blueberries might turn out to be beneficial not only for improvement of memory, but for slowing down or postponing the onset of other cognitive problems frequently associated with aging. Have you eaten your blueberries today? Ask your doctor about additional benefits of blueberries and other super foods.

Do you know our story?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

_PCC5035   With a real need for expanded medical services in the Southern Colorado area, we were formed in 1987 by a great group of Saint Mary Corwin residents looking to use their knowledge and help people where help was needed most. Patient care isn't just treating patents with this practice, we view patient care as a partnership and want our patients to participate in their own medical needs and continue their prospering health with proactive preventative medicine. We believe in a holistic view that restores the immune system and creating a healthy and balanced life plan to keep illness and disease at bay. Since we were founded, our practice has continued to grow. We are an independent medical facility with local ownership. We have a great new group of providers and outstanding selection of services that are thriving in our community. As an active member of the Pueblo business community, but proudly serves all residents of Southern Colorado including Pueblo, Pueblo West, the Arkansas Valley, Colorado City and Rye. With our outstanding reputation among local families, as well as area medical professionals, is a testament to the loyalty of our practitioners, their dedication to medical development and their compassionate family care. We continually strive to give the best possible care to our patients and help them live a healthy life.