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Showing posts from tagged with: mens health

Men’s Health: September is Prostate Health Awareness Month.

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Men’s Health: September is Prostate Health Awareness Month. prostate-health Did you know, the prostate is a male body gland that is essential for fertility but not for erections, and just happens to enlarge, rather than shrink, with age?   The prostate is younger males is roughly the size of a walnut, but as men age and for reasons still unclear, the prostate continues to grow bigger as a man gets older. This enlargement is often the cause of the urination issues that occur in half of all men by age 60 and in almost all men by age 80.   In addition to urination issues, the prostate harbors the most common solid cancer in men, prostate cancer. Fortunately, most cases are caught early and cure rates are extremely high, although prostate cancer only rarely causes symptoms. Prostate cancer is much more slow-growing than most cancers, doubling in size every 2-3 years instead of every 4-6 months like other cancers. That said, a man is 8-10 times more likely to die of heart disease than prostate cancer.   Prostate cancer increases with a man's age. This often means many men have it but never know it.. Although genetics plays a role in the development of prostate cancer, there are also things you can do to prevent it.   Following a heart-healthy, low animal fat, low carbohydrate diet is key to cancer prevention, as are exercise, weight management and stress reduction. Enjoy fruits and vegetables that are high in antioxidants to protect your body from cancer-causing oxidants. Soy and green tea may be especially good for the prostate. Eat more fish, a good source of omega-3 fatty acids.There is also good data to suggest that a certain class of pills used to slow BPH (5-alpha reductase inhibitors) can reduce the occurrence of low-grade prostate cancer by 25%.   Please don't ignore the prostate. Attend to it before it disrupts your daily life. And that means taking great care of the body around it. In addition, the American Urological Association recommends screening for prostate cancer between the ages of 55 to 70 years. Compared to a root canal, this screening is much easier, involving a quick rectal exam and blood testing for PSA.   September is prostate health month. If you haven’t had your prostate checked in a while, please make an appointment with us to do so. Happy prostate, happy life!

Prostate Cancer

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

prostate cancer Prostate Cancer With June being Men’s health awareness month, we’d like to discuss prostate cancer in this blog post. Prostate cancer has become one of the most common cancers found in men and it’s an important point of discussion and something everyone should be aware of. Here are a few things to know about the prostate and prostate cancer:

  • The prostate is a gland found only in men. It is about the size of a walnut and sits below the bladder.
  • Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. One in seven men in the United States will be diagnosed with the disease in his lifetime.
  • Compared to other men, African-American men and men with a family history of the disease are at higher risk of developing prostate cancer. A man with a father or brother who had prostate cancer is twice as likely to develop the disease.
  • The BRCA 1/2 mutation is also believed to increase prostate cancer risk.
All men are at risk for prostate cancer at any point in their lifetime.  However, there are specific risk factors that increase the likelihood that certain men will develop the disease. Risk factors include:
  • Age: Aggressive prostate cancer is virtually nonexistent in men under 40. With age, however, the chance of developing prostate cancer increases. Nearly two-thirds of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over 65, and nearly one-half of prostate cancer deaths occur in men initially diagnosed after 75.
  • Race: Prostate cancer is about twice as common among African-American men as it is among white American men.
  • Diet: Epidemiological data suggest that the diet consumed in industrialized Western countries may be a factor in developing prostate cancer. Consider the following information regarding diet and its effect on the risk for prostate cancer:
    • Fat: Some studies suggest that men who eat a high-fat diet, especially if it is high in red meat or high-fat dairy products, may have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer.
    • Fruits and vegetables: Diets high in fruits and vegetables may lower prostate cancer risk, although it is not clear which nutrient(s) may be responsible for this.
    • Carotenoids: Carotenoids, such as lycopenes, have been shown to inhibit the growth of human prostate cancer cells grown in the laboratory. The primary source of lycopenes is processed tomatoes. Again, however, it is not clear if lycopenes affect prostate cancer risk in men, as not all studies have found a benefit.
  Talk to your doctor if you or a loved one is at risk of prostate cancer. One chat could save a life.

What is cancer?

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

Next month is breast cancer awareness month. Get ready to spread the word. Do you really know what cancer is? Take a look at the National Breast Cancer Foundation's informative video below outlining the facts about what cancer is.

National Men’s Health Week – June 13–19

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

NMHWEEK-2015With Father's Day soon approaching, did you know Father’s Day also falls during National Men’s Health week? It’s not a coincidence that we celebrate dad and Men’s Health in one week. The purpose of Men’s Health Month is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. This month gives healthcare providers, public policy makers, the media, and individuals an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury. The response has been overwhelming with thousands of awareness activities in the USA and around the globe.   For more information on National Men’s Health week, visit menshealthweek.org.  

Movember – Raise Awareness for Men’s Health

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  movember   “Movember” is an annual month long celebration to raise awareness for men’s health issues, such as depression in men, prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and other male cancers, and associated charities. During the month of November, men generally take part in this celebration by growing moustaches to raise awareness for the cause. The overall goal of Movember is to "change the face of men's health, according to the Movember foundation.   Are you growing your Movember moustache? Whether you are male or female click here to find out more about how you can support the cause.

Men’s Health Month

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

Mens health month June is national Men’s Health Month. The purpose of Men’s Health Month is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. This month gives healthcare providers, public policy makers, the media, and individuals an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury. The response has been overwhelming with thousands of awareness activities in the USA and around the globe. Anchored by a Congressional health education program, Men’s Health Month is celebrated across the country with screenings, health fairs, media appearances, and other health education and outreach activities. For more information about how you can help the men in your life make sure their health is great, contact us today.

Men’s Health ­- Low Testosterone

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

mens health We are seeing more and more cases of low testosterone in male patients, but what does “low testosterone” actually mean? Testosterone is a hormone produced in the human body, mainly found in male anatomy. It stimulates sperm production and a man’s sex drive, but it also helps build muscle and important bone mass. Testosterone typically decreases as men get older. Men experience a wide range of symptoms of low testosterone including hair loss, fatigue and lack of energy, loss of energy, weight gain, decrease in sex drive, mood changes and more. Low testosterone is diagnosed when levels fall below a normal range of 300­1000 ng/dL. A simple blood test can be used to determine if testosterone levels are low. If you are feeling an abnormal change to your lifestyle, let us know. By diagnosing the problem, we can offer you treatment options to help.