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Showing posts from tagged with: protect your skin

Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

  Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month - With the sheer amount of sun exposure we get here in Colorado, it’s very important to make sure you are always wearing your sunscreen! And here is why.   skin cancer awareness   Facts & Figures: According to the Skin Cancer Foundation:

  • More than 5.4 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer were treated in over 3.3 million people in the U.S. in 2012, the most recent year new statistics were available.
  • More people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined.
  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer by the age of 70
  • Actinic keratosis is the most common pre cancer, affecting more than 58 million Americans.
  • The annual cost of treating skin cancers in the U.S. is estimated at $8.1 billion: about $4.8 billion for nonmelanoma skin cancers and $3.3 billion for melanoma.
  Tips and Tricks to avoid getting too much sun: There are so many easy ways you can prevent skin cancer. Whether it’s applying sunscreen regularly, covering your skin and wearing UV protective clothing, or just choosing a shady spot to have your outdoor picnic, it’s easy to limit the amount of sun you get. The following are a few ideas on how you can avoid skin cancer:
  • Seek the shade, especially between 10 AM and 4 PM.
  • Avoid getting a sunburn at all costs.
  • Avoid tanning and UV tanning beds.
  • Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  • Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating.
  • Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens should be used on babies over the age of six months.
  • Examine your skin head-to-toe every month.
  • See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.
  For more information about skin cancer and your sun exposure, talk to your doctor.

Protect your skin

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

protect your skin Protect your skin April showers, bring May flowers. And also bring skin damage if you’re outside enjoying the wonderful spring weather when it’s not raining.   As spring arrives, outdoor activities spike in Colorado. With the wonderful spring weather, it’s important to remember to keep your skin protected. You may often fall to the allure of getting a little more sun than you received all winter. But it’s always very important to make sure you have applied your sunscreen prior to getting sun.   Do you understand SPF? Sun Protection Factor, otherwise known as SPF refers to the amount of time you can stay in the sun without getting sunburned. In theory, an SPF of 15 would allow you to stay in the sun 15 times longer than you could without protection. A product with an SPF of 15 will filter out approximately 93 percent of UVB rays; SPF 30 filters out about 97 percent. It is always recommended that you start with an SPF of 30 but other factors such as skin tone, history of skin cancer, and more can affect how your skin will react in the sun.   Therefore, it’s important to keep in mind the following tips.   Select Sunscreen with UVA and UVB. Choose a sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB. Look for products containing zinc oxide or titanium dioxide because they protect against the full spectrum of rays and keep you covered more than other sunscreens.   Lotion Up Often Reapply sunscreen at least every two hours. And more often  if you swim or exercise. Water, sweat, and clothing can remove sunscreen from your skin. Apply liberally and often.   Consider Sun-Protective Clothing Choose clothing that covers you up before going into the sun. Dark cothing can block nearly all UV radiation and tightly woven fabrics are more protective than looser weaves. If you’re wondering how well your clothing will protect you, just hold it up to the sun. If you can see light passing through it, UV rays can get through, too.   Check your skin regularly Keep an eye on your skin even when you’re not in the sun. Look for new moles or changes in older ones. If you have concerns, report them to your primary care provider or dermatologist. Your doctor can take a look, and, if needed, refer you to a specialist.   Still have questions about sunblock and skin damage? Talk to your doctor and have them screen you for any possible signs of skin damage.

Mosquito Protection – Against Zika

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Company News | 0 comments

zika spray The Zika virus has not left the news and continues to be a topic. But what can we do to steer clear of Zika? Because it’s a mosquito borne virus, whether it’s been found in your location or not, staying covered and using bug spray will significantly help. Below is a list that the CDC recently published to help you to prevent mosquito bites. When in areas with Zika and other diseases spread by mosquitoes, take the following steps:

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Take steps to control mosquitoes inside and outside your home.  
  • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and are not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.
  • Use EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)-registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol. Choosing an EPA-registered repellent ensures the EPA has evaluated the product for effectiveness. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.
    • Always follow the product label instructions.
    • Re-apply insect repellent as directed.
    • Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.
    • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.
  • To protect your child from mosquito bites:
    • Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old.
    • Do not use products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on children younger than 3 years old.
    • Dress your child in clothing that covers arms and legs.
    • Cover crib, stroller, and baby carrier with mosquito netting.
    • Do not apply insect repellent onto a child’s hands, eyes, mouth, and cut or irritated skin.
    • Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to a child’s face.
  • Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.
    • Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See product information to learn how long the protection will last.
    • If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
    • Do NOT use permethrin products directly on skin. They are intended to treat clothing.
Still have questions? Talk to your doctor for more information on the Zika Virus.