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Showing posts from tagged with: psoriasis and depression

Psoriasis and Associated Conditions

Posted by UFMC Pueblo in Company News | 0 comments

psoriasis As if living with psoriasis isn’t enough. When one has psoriasis, there are other conditions that those living with it are prone to. See the full list below. Psoriatic arthritis.  One in every three people with psoriasis also develop psoriatic arthritis, a condition that causes pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints. However, some people have psoriatic arthritis without developing psoriasis. Cardiovascular disease.  According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, if you have severe psoriasis, your chance of having a major cardiac event is 58 percent higher than that of people who don't have psoriasis, and your risk for stroke is 43 percent higher. Diabetes. People with severe psoriasis are 46 percent more likely to also have type 2 diabetes, and those with mild psoriasis are 11 percent more likely — even in the absence of traditional risk factors for this form of diabetes, such as obesity. Inflammation can cause or exacerbate insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Mood disorders. One in every four people with psoriasis experience depression, when they have psoriasis. This likely results from the pain, anxiety, and decreased self-esteem that often accompanies the disease. Cancer. Psoriasis has also been associated with an increased risk for certain cancers, such squamous cell carcinoma and lymphoma. One study found that people with psoriasis are 40 percent more likely to develop certain types of cancer than the general population are, but the actual cause of this increased cancer risk is still unclear Obesity. People with psoriasis are more likely to be obese than people without psoriasis, with a 30 percent increased risk for those with mild psoriasis and an 80 percent increased risk for those with severe psoriasis. Kidney disease. Researchers found a 36 percent greater risk of kidney disease for those with moderate psoriasis and 58 percent greater risk for those with severe psoriasis. However, if your psoriasis is mild — defined as affecting 2 percent or less of your total body surface — your risk usually will be no greater than that of the general population. Peptic ulcers. People with psoriasis are 22 percent more likely to get ulcers than people without psoriasis. High cholesterol. High levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (or LDL) cholesterol are also more common among people with psoriasis. In fact, psoriasis brings a 28 percent increased risk for high cholesterol compared to the risk among the general public. If you have psoriasis and have questions about other conditions that may arise, speak with your doctor.

Psoriasis and Depression

Posted by UFMC Pueblo in Company News | 0 comments

psoriasis_depression Studies have found, many living with psoriasis, an autoimmune disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin, are twice as likely to become depressed as the rest of the population. Physicians believe the biological changes that cause psoriasis may also cause depression, and the visible symptoms associated are often additional triggers for depression as well. Depression can have a significant impact on quality of life. It's important to look out for symptoms of depression and seek treatment if you’re dealing with psoriasis. If you have any of the following symptoms, discuss them with your doctor:

  • Problems sleeping
  • Feeling like you cannot get out of bed
  • Low or loss of energy
  • Lack of interest in things you used to enjoy
  • Problems focusing
  For more information on psoriasis and depression related to the autoimmune disease, talk to your doctor.