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Showing posts from tagged with: spring health

Get-Healthy Ideas for Spring

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Flowers are blooming, the birds are chirping, and the sun is staying up longer. And here in Colorado, depending on what part you’re in, we may still even be shoveling snow. It’s this time of year that runners ditch their treadmill for the trail, spring fruit and veggie recipes start to emerge and people are embracing this great transition into summer. It's time for a healthy spring. healthy spring Here are four new ideas for embracing spring.

  • Start cleaning - Spring cleaning! Not only is it a good idea to declutter and organize your house, but take the time to recharge your mind and evaluate your social and work schedule to make more time for yourself.
  • Swap the winter soups with fresh salads. Get creative and swap out plain lettuce or romaine for arugula, spinach or kale. Also, try experimenting with new vegetables, like this Endive and Snap Peas Salad with a homemade dressing.
  • Get active outdoors! Take a run through the park or grab a friend for a hike. It's nice to come out of hibernation and get a dose of fresh air and feel re-energized in your workout. Get outside and get some fresh air while you work out.
  • Eat healthy and have a picnic. Pack a healthy lunch, grab your family, a blanket and head over to your favorite scenic spot. Not sure what to pack? Finger foods, like veggies or salsa are easy to pack and make for convenient snacking.
  We’re loving this spring weather and hope you are too. Take advantage of it and get outside to play.

Kids Health: Seasonal Allergies

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Kids Health- Seasonal Allergies Kids Health: Seasonal Allergies - Your kids are having sneezing fits, and cold-like systems —sneezing, congestion, and runny nose. Think it’s just a spring cold? It could actually be seasonal allergies. Colds and seasonal allergies have similar symptoms but generally happen at the same time every year. Often called "hay fever", otherwise known as seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that happen during certain times of the year, usually when outdoor molds release their spores, and trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny pollen particles into the air to fertilize other plants. An immune system of one that is allergic to mold spores or pollen treat these particles (called allergens) are treated by the body as invaders, and your body feels the need to defend against them. It's the release of these invaders that causes allergy symptoms. Kids can be allergic to one or more types of pollen or mold. The type someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen. For example, in some states tree pollination is February through May, grass pollen runs from May through June, and weed pollen is from August through October. That said, some kids with these allergies are likely to have increased symptoms at those times. Even kids who have never had seasonal allergies in years past can develop them. Seasonal allergies can start at almost any age, though they usually develop by the time a child is 10 years old and reach their peak in the early twenties, with symptoms often disappearing later in adulthood. Signs and Symptoms If your child develops a "cold" at the same time every year, seasonal allergies might be to blame. Allergy symptoms, which usually come on suddenly and last as long as a person is exposed to the allergen, can include:

  • Nasal congestion
  • Sneezing
  • Coughing
  • Itchy nose and/or throat
  • Clear, runny nose
  • Itchy, watery and/or red eyes
Kids who have wheezing and shortness of breath in addition to these symptoms might have allergies that trigger asthma. Think your child may have allergies? Make an appointment today and we will find out.

Ticks and Lyme Disease

Posted by Emily Ledergerber in Uncategorized | 0 comments

sumptoms-lyme-disease Coloradans are known to love hiking, being outside and getting into the mountains. Colorado also has ticks, which can cause problems to our health, including Lyme disease. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in these regions, Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of an infected black-legged tick, commonly known as a deer tick. You're more likely to get Lyme disease if you live or spend time in grassy and heavily wooded areas where ticks carrying Lyme disease thrive. It's important to know the signs and symptoms and take common-sense precautions in tick-infested areas. According to the Mayo Clinic the following signs and symptoms are often common with Lyme disease.  

Signs and Symptoms:

Signs and symptoms of Lyme disease can vary. They usually appear in stages, but the stages can overlap.

Stage 1: Early signs and symptoms

A small, red bump, similar to the bump of a mosquito bite, often appears at the site of a tick bite,  or often the actual tick will be in the place of the bite. A tick removal and red bum often resolves over a few days. This normal occurrence doesn't indicate Lyme disease. However, these signs and symptoms can occur within a month after you've been infected:

  • Rash. From three to 30 days after an infected tick bite, an expanding red area might appear that sometimes clears in the center, forming a bull's-eye pattern. The rash (Erythema migrans) expands slowly over days and can spread to 12 inches (30 centimeters) across. It's typically not itchy or painful but might feel warm to the touch.
  • Erythema migrans is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease, although not everyone with Lyme disease develops the rash. Some people develop this rash at more than one place on their bodies.
  • Other symptoms. Fever, chills, fatigue, body aches, headache, neck stiffness and swollen lymph nodes can accompany the rash.

Stage 2: Later signs and symptoms

If you do have Lyme disease and it goes untreated untreated, new signs and symptoms of Lyme infection might appear in the following weeks to months. These include:

  • Erythema migrans. The rash may appear on other areas of your body.
  • Joint pain. Bouts of severe joint pain and swelling are especially likely to affect your knees, but the pain can shift from one joint to another.
  • Neurological problems. Weeks, months or even years after infection, you might develop inflammation of the membranes surrounding your brain (meningitis), temporary paralysis of one side of your face (Bell's palsy), numbness or weakness in your limbs, and impaired muscle movement.
 

When to see your doctor

If you've been bitten by a tick and have symptoms Only a minority of tick bites leads to Lyme disease. The longer the tick remains attached to your skin, the greater your risk of getting the disease. Lyme infection is unlikely if the tick is attached for less than 36 to 48 hours.   If you think you've been bitten and have signs and symptoms of Lyme disease — particularly if you live in an area where Lyme disease is prevalent — contact your doctor. Treatment for Lyme disease is more effective if begun early.   See your doctor even if symptoms disappear Consult your doctor even if signs and symptoms disappear — the absence of symptoms doesn't mean the disease is gone. Untreated, Lyme disease can spread to other parts of your body for several months to years after infection, causing arthritis and nervous system problems. Ticks can also transmit other illnesses, such as babesiosis and Colorado tick fever.